Monthly Archives: July 2019

What I think of Christians at Pride

There was quite a noisy group at my recent most local LGBT etc Pride, who now have a prominent stall. They have their own uniforms – a T-shirt with a slogan which matches their banner; and then a self styled one of rainbow dog collars… for these are Christians, and several are clergy.

On one hand, it’s to be applauded that this group is there and is trying to be visible, despite the fact that some other Christians criticise them. I also overheard a flag clad woman holding the hand of another comment: I hate it when the Church tries to join in with our day.

And I – a woman on the outer edges of both worlds – understood that.

The Christians in the parade want to say: we accept you, LGBT+ people. (Often they mean just gay… I’m not sure churches have got their heads round all the letters yet.) They acknowledge that Christianity and other faiths have hitherto persecuted their gay siblings – and some still do.

I’d like to point out that the notion that same sex love as being something to decry and exclude over has come from faith groups.

Many of those who still judge homosexuals are those with a conservative faith.

So one could say that the need for Pride came out of religious prohibition, which influenced laws and morals and medicine, so that what denounces LGBT people can be traced to faith roots.

Hence, it’s brave but ironic that there is a Christian presence at Pride.

Sadly like many, I have experienced struggle in coming to terms with not being heterosexual, especially as a woman of faith. I’ve written and published a novel about it, which is available to buy from many online sources, called Parallel Spirals. There will be a sequel.

I happen to know that many of the people on the Christian stall and march are not LGBT. They’re allies, but they have not experienced the challenges of the realisation that you are other, and that otherness may not be welcome. They have not sat in a pew (or sofa with a smoothie, if you’re that kind of church) wondering if the message of God’s love and theirs will still apply if this church really knew them and who they loved. Would they still get a hug (or even a handshake) in the peace; would they still get an invite to homegroups or youth or elder groups or those endless barbecues or garden parties if the truth about them was known? Would they still be allowed their positions of leadership if it was known what they were really like? Do these church people know what it’s like to earnestly search scripture to see if they really are condemned? NO YOU AREN’T, by the way!! Do they have to hear exhortions about the sanctity of marriage between a man and woman and the inevitable family you’re supposed to have, and feel nervous and excluded? Have they had to put up with people who have – almost for granted – what you don’t, and tell you that you can’t have it – namely marriage and family?

Of course, nongay people in church have other kinds of suffering and misfitting, and it might allow them to have great empathy and solidarity with the people that Pink Pride is about. I’ve heard people speak of other kinds of otherness… it’s not only LGBT people who feel a sense of not fitting, if not exclusion, in their faith communities.

But some seem to be presumptious and patronising. Is it fair to say it’s like white people in a Black celebration saying “We weren’t slaves ourselves, but we do know how you feel”? Of course it’s their way of saying – you never should have been, and we stand with you to show we’re not part of that. We see the well-meaning as much as we might cringe at the execution.

It’s also easy for the oppressed to allow no outsiders to sympathise. Am I angry at men against  violence against women in White Ribbon? Have I not applauded those who stand with something they’re not? Would I not march in solidarity with something  I care about, and be put off if I was told that I had no right to, as I’m outside the oppressed group?

I observed this tribe within a tribe with bemusement, oblivious to how their rainbow stickers and collars seemed amongst the outre costumes, squirting their God’s love like bubbles to passers by with the proffering of a gay positive sticker and a few words…but these little interactions felt like that delicate transient rainbow film.

Or actually, was that bubble the start of a new idea, a new relationship?

So am I saying that Christians shouldn’t have a stall at Pride? Am I saying that their well intentioned solidarity is wrong? No…but am am saying: your message has to be relevant and congruent and consistent, and be aware of how it looks from the other side. Don’t pretend you easily understand when you don’t… But actually, you might. And yes, I do think my novel can help with that. Listen to LGBT people and hear their stories. It will mean really chatting – often in a way that you can’t at fast moving, raucous Prides – and really sitting with them, being prepared to follow up, and to hear how LGBT+ people feel about faith and church and what it’s done to them. And to put it right and show a better way. As I know you can.

And actually, I’m quite touched that a group gives up its day to show that solidarity for something they aren’t, risking censure from both sides, and to transform the view and relationship from judgement and exclusion into love and welcome.

 

 

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Why Cloudfare makes my nostrils flare

eroding privacy in the name of security

 

Many of us are waking up to the huge erosion of our privacy in electronic communications.

We’re aware of the PRISM/Tempura story of 6 years ago, where CSA whistleblower Edward Snowden revealed the extent that our governments spy on their citizens and share that information…that our internet and phone use is watched and recorded… The film about him starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Shailene Woodley revealed that the CSA can watch us through our webcam, via fibre optic cables, even when the computer’s off.

Hence, he put something over the camera eye.

We’re increasingly aware of Facebook, Google and Microsoft being part of this surveillance, accumulating our browsing habits to not only send to advertisers, but to the secret agencies, using terrorism as an excuse and to make citizens compliant.

But terrorism isn’t appropriate to the vast majority of us, and yet we’re being watched anyway… and we’re aware that terrorism and dissent are becoming synonymous.

Hence more of us are taking steps against this and switching our browsers and search engines to ones which don’t track us across the internet and record any browsing history.

Private Browsing in most browsers only prevents other users of that computer in following your online sessions, not the browser or your internet service provider, who are also hoovering up and selling your details – and you’re paying them to do it!

There are some smaller browsers and search engines which take our privacy more seriously.

These include Epic (hard to download and use, curiously) and Brave and TOR – The Onion Router – for the former, and DuckDuckGo and Startpage for the latter. Reading their privacy tips and warnings are galling, for even the size of your screen can help give you away. There’s HTML5 canvas image data extraction, and this is part of ‘fingerprinting’ – websites being able to discover who and where you are, and what you do.

In Windows 10, the privacy settings – now split into two places to look – are defaulted to yes…use my camera, microphone, physical location… allow remote access…

Even some of these more private browsers have default settings to allow Facebook and Google – the very places to avoid – to set cookies and have other permissions.

I’m appalled that even blocking 3rd party cookies and device recognition, as well as hated JavaScript, is enough to make many websites break. To look up a train time, I get warning messages – even in a less private browser – that this information is being shared. I can’t get into my email account with the settings I’d like in place. I’ve even seen some spiritual websites – one with a prayer request form – make visitors be open to trackers to be able to submit that request!!

Hence my ire at Cloudflare, a widely used supposedly security enhancing tool and company. It’s meant to stop robots from spamming or sending malware, but I’m more suspicious that cybercrime is mostly a myth and there’s some ironic Sylvester Sneakly/Hooded Claw plot that the security programs and their manifold updates are the sinister part.

I’m not going to reveal my browsing habits, but I will say that many things I look up aren’t things I want to share with a third party. No – let me make clear – I never want anything I do anywhere shared with anyone that I don’t choose.

I utterly reject “If I’m not doing wrong, I don’t mind.” I mind very much, and so should you.

But the internet is a good resource for connecting and researching, perhaps things we wouldn’t readily tell those around us. Do you want every book you pick up off a shelf known to people who don’t even know you? Do you want every video and piece of music you play known? (by the way, it is unless you block it). Have you not ever tried to find resources about something that you wouldn’t want made generally public? Have you wanted to introduce yourself to staff in every shop you go in? Have you ever been worried by something that you wouldn’t want to tell other people about?

Hence, some of us will set our privacy high and use browsers that block the ridiculous amounts of adverts which slow down our browsing and waste our internet data allowance. We don’t want to see adverts about the legal services we looked up, or that health problem, or the sexuality related matter we sought succour about. We don’t want our moving or surprise holiday plans or new job revealed by adverts appearing the next time we use our device.

But Cloudflare blocks these browsers, and it’s used by places where i) sites can be personal and ii) the users thereof may well be questioners and people who uphold privacy rights.

I’m frustrated – and so are others – by the amount of sites who won’t let you in, treating you as some kind of attack. Or they’ll make you try to perform a hated recaptcha check, which involves Google’s intrusion. Mostly with my preferred security settings, these stupid ‘click all the squares with…’ tasks don’t work. It’s very US focussed so some other users might not recongise what they’re being asked to so, and it’s not clear that you’re meant to choose squares with a tiny bit of something. So it’s easy to get wrong, even as a real sentient human…meanwhile, you’re automatically held into Google’s privacy…to prove you’re real. See the irony?

And I think they’re really trying to get private browsers to reveal themselves.

So I leave those sites, for I feel: if they’re using Cloudflare to bully me into giving my identity away, then I don’t need to read that article afterall.

I thus challenge users of Cloudflare and Cloudflare itself to rethink, along with all those who utilise recaptcha. Note the name – its real purpose is revealed.

And I won’t be netted by anyone.

(And WordPress, you’re still breaking Cookie Law with you assumed opt in)

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