Tag Archives: health

Robert Potato Peel Pie

Remember the Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie society?

Here’s a recipe involving the peel of a certain 19th C British baronet, with a little Hartley’s jam…

Cooking (reading) time: about 20 mins

I was intrigued that He Who Set Up England’s Police has just been in the news. Statues in Robert Peel’s honour are now an endangered species, for they may be destined to go the way of Edward Colston’s last Sunday (7th). I confess I laughed when I heard that the likeness of this unpopular 17th C Bristol magnate ended up in the Frome, in daylight and in front of a crowd.

His removal was long overdue. In 2007, at the bicentenary of the abolition of slavery in Britain, residents questioned why this man from 300 years ago whose wealth came from the slave trade, whose contributions (except the almshouses named after him) to the city are no longer tangible, should still be sitting in the middle of it. The nearby concert hall was being renovated, and much of the populace asked why this venue and its street bore his name. Bristol – the city of Princess Caraboo, Hannah Moore and Dorothy Hazzard – has a rich history of memorable people and a recent heritage of musicians. So why – if the largest music venue in the city needed to be named after anyone – did they pick someone who lived long before this hall, and who has no connection to music, but plenty to an abhorrent and obsolete trade? I was surprised that the statue and the hall – now with a ridiculous gold extension – had survived thus far.

I am pleased that we are asking about who we give honour to and if it is right to still give them honour. I note that like Colston’s displaced effigy, much statuary in Britain is 19th century, sometimes several after the person’s life; and that as one person put it, it’s public veneration. I like Christopher Wren’s epitaph – that on principle, we should be able to look round and see what they did. Not that I necessarily esteem the bewigged polymath and possible Illuminati member, just the notion that I shouldn’t need an eerie graven image to remind of what you’ve done.

I realise how many of Britain’s statues are of war heroes and states people: those whom we perceive made us great. I also note that many of our historic townhouses are named after historic rich men who were also public figures. Each time, this wealthy ‘successful’ businessman was also a statesman – MP, sheriff or mayor, often repeatedly. This ancient correlation continues.

So as I meld back to Robert Peel, I want to have in mind who were revere and remember, and that today, wealthy business people still steer our cities and countries (as well as get the best properties).

Robert too was from a wealthy business family, made from cotton, in the north west of England before moving to the West Midlands. Bury and Tamworth, who have statues to him, are now asking if they want to keep them.

Conservative media point out that activists may have confused his father – also Robert Peel – who opposed the abolition of slavery act in Britain because of the loss of revenue it would cause. Presumably he saw himself in that category, since cotton manufacture involved slave plantations. It’s said that we don’t know whether son was like father, and that Bobby jnr was too junior to have made much input to his father’s late 18th C decisions. Fair… but I thought that it wasn’t due to slave support that Sir Peel II was now on the not/wanted list: it was his police record.

It’s well known in Britain that Robert Peel set up our police, although I didn’t know the story. I thought that literally he was the first superintendent of the force, or perhaps even took on the role himself as a lone officer. Robert Peel didn’t do policing though: he created it. He was an MP and later prime minister in Britain, dying in 1850; and he was titled – 2nd baronet. He went to what we might call privileged educational establishments and lived in a hall. He founded the Conservative Party.

That doesn’t make him the enemy, although I confess that I baulked at reading this about him.

Peel is called the father of modern policing (note the paternalistic term), because by setting up the Metropolitan Police in London, he paved the way not only for the rest of England to have its own forces (Scotland already had one) but his example was followed in America.

So what did our example inspire or unleash on the world?

Bobby left us with 9 principles of policing which I’ve seen adopted in America as well as here – a sort of 10-1 commandments for law enforcement. Pro-police writers remind that Robert’s reforms cut hangable offences by 100 – so how many were left, I ask? – and working hours and child labour. So he did do some things right, or at least, better than his forebears. He also saved the country from its existing state of martial law enforcement; his ‘Peelers’ only had truncheons (wooden batons), not swords and guns, and their uniform was deliberately different from the red coats of the hussars, so that it was clear that a Peeler was not a soldier.

Can I stamp on this notion put about that we in Britain still call police ‘Peelers’. The only time I’ve heard that term used is when it is prefixed by Potato.

I’ll comment briefly on just four of those nine principles.

Note that police around the world are not keeping to these.

1) proportion, and persuasion first; never use more force than necessary

so no brutalities then, such as the ones that sparked all the riots recently or the abuse I read of today by an officer to another woman, allegedly seeking drugs

I agree to the first clause, but I wonder about the second ever being so; it is widely misused

2) police cannot usurp the judiciary – so no killing suspects and dispensing with trials

But the judiciary is not sovereign and untouchable, nor incorruptible; it too needs reform

3) Impartial upholding of the law – so no prejudice; but impartial can also lead to blind pernickityness; and the law itself needs much scrutiny (and will get it from me in another piece)

4) police are the people, and vice versa: that citizens are assumed to uphold the law and enforce it where they see it being broken

This makes assumptions about citizenry. We can’t opt in or out and we rarely have much say about the laws created, nor do we always agree with them. So whereas Bobby was expecting high standards of his namesakes, and society, I find that a bind which actually goes wrong…

Firstly, there is what kind of person joins the police – which is a topic to come back to…

This principle also gives support to the prevalent push that we can handle our problems without police – fodder for another article…

I want to focus on what was happening in England during the time of modern police forces’ inception. I remind that many US writers have commented that slave and immigration control were connected. I heard that London – England’s first force – was about custody of cargo.

So, I wondered, did England’s other contemporary great dock city – Liverpool – follow suit?

The banner photo on this blog is of Liverpool.

I recalled a snippet from a book on Liverpool’s docks by Ron Jones that made me want to investigate.

The official police in Liverpool seems formed by an act of parliament in 1835; although, as elsewhere, they existed in some form previously. This means, they were 6 years after London’s.

I wondered why it needed a central government act to create them as well as the docks I’ll soon get to…

In August 1819, the Peterloo massacre occurred in Manchester, a rival town in the same county which produced much of the goods that Liverpool got rich on shipping. A large (size unverified) crowd met to discuss equality and universal suffrage – for not even all men could vote yet. Their banners even included the word ‘love’. But over 2000 soldiers on horseback set upon what’s normally described as a peaceful crowd, and hacked at these unarmed civilians with swords. They wanted to charge the speakers, such as Henry Hunt, with treason (which was dropped), they set on journalists, and rushed through an inquiry. I watched Timeline dramatised TV based on the transcript of the inquest of one man, Lees. The trial was held, not in a proper court or a public space, but a pub in the next town. The witnesses – cotton workers, the mainstay of the town – were terrified as the magistrates were also their employers and landlords; some had even been part of the yeoman who attacked. As London lawyer, Mr Harmer, acting for the deceased’s father, made progress in showing the corruption and violent intent of the soldiers and town leaders, the coroner shut down the case.

However, it is often seen that this event was key in bringing about change, although not the revolutionary ones which were hoped for and feared, and not all immediately.

It did lead to the setting up of the [Manchester] Guardian newspaper, Britain’s most left wing daily broadsheet, and an important voice of supposed free and thorough journalism.

In 1831, riots occurred, notably in Bristol and Nottingham. Some of the fuel to the literal fires – the custom house, mayoral and bishop’s residences in the former, and ducal castle in the latter were burned – was the refusal to pass the Reform Bill. This Act is behind George Eliot’s novel Middlemarch, which describes the ‘rotten boroughs’, meaning that Members of Parliament were not representative of the population, by any means; it was a bribable boy’s club with easy to keep seats. The bill took up some of the issues that those Lancastrians of 12 years before had met about. But also, the city corporations also were seen as corrupt and self serving, as was especially felt in Bristol, Nottingham, and in Liverpool. The rioters’ quarry were people who had helped block this important bill for greater fairness. It was enacted the following year, and ‘rotten boroughs’ were no more.

Sadly, many of us feel that our government is still mainly self serving and not representative, and are effectively bribed by the wealthy elite.

Several accounts of these riots – such as you might read in a guidebook – don’t tell you that the soldiers again set upon their people. They’ll instead tell you how much property was damaged.

——————————–

The Police and Albert Docks

Many readers, perhaps those not from Britain too, will recognise that place. It’s famous – the Merseyside Metropolis has made it so. They are the synecdoche for the whole of a huge system, mostly designed by one man, Jesse R R Hartley Hare*. I wonder if his statues and plaques are on the Unpopular List? (*Hartley Hare is from kid’s TV; and J R R Hartley wrote a book on fly fishing).

Much of Ron Jones’s book, like others, boasts about the wonders of Liverpool (yes, I am already a fan) and its docks, but I realised that my values have changed. I’ll write a report on my travel blog. In short, Liverpool was built on the wealth that its port gave it, but it was a very divided city. The story I recalled was that when Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria, came to open the much vaunted groundbreaking dock in his name in July 1846, many of the half a million who came to greet him couldn’t afford shoes.

There were other significant visitors to Liverpool that year. Lots of them. They came from the West. Unlike the Prince, they weren’t guests of honour. They’d come in hordes, in desperation, due to a potato famine that they saw their neighbouring country as having contributed to.

These Irish families – already destitute, tired, stressed, displaced – were squeezed into tight ghettoes. 20,000 citizens – that’s about a tenth of Liverpool at the time – were sworn in as special constables (ie plain clothes police for a particular s/reason) to help control these asylum seekers.

Not to welcome or support them, but contain them.

Now I’m not assuming that there was no trouble from these immigrants, any more than I’m supporting the rioters of the previous decade; but I am questioning how they are portrayed and how much their treatment added to the ‘social problems’ that we conveniently and patronisingly file them under.

I’d like to point out that these immigrants were white, and the same ethnicity as the indigenous people of Liverpool.

In Ron Jones’s book, I noted a comment which wasn’t critical but which should have been, and is very timely. A local lecturer, Dr William H Duncan, spoke out against the diseases that he said were rife in these Irish cramped lodgings, and said that they endangered everyone else in the city, morally and physically. This man then went on to be the first chief health minister for the country.

I very much take issue with this, which used health of others to demonise these Irish and other poor people, and use ‘infection’ as an excuse to control them and knock down their homes. The book doesn’t say what happened to the residents.

I’d like to say – and remember, I am very fond of Liverpool – that a city which is very cultural today and famous for certain musicians especially – was actually slow to get culture. At Albert’s visit, it didn’t even have a theatre yet, a lifetime behind more provincial towns. Even its classy residents who lived in terraces or mansions far from the stinky water which gave them their wealth celebrated key events not long before with bear and bull baiting. So the rich too engaged in activities which were considered morally dubious. Yet here was one putting moral fibre next to illness and equating the two. Familiar?

What did those new docks really mean?

I wonder if Jesse Hartley will join the not-so-wanted list. Of his day, I can see that he could be a hero, and that the wealth he helped amass for Liverpool (not even his native town, he’s from Yorkshire) would make him celebrated. As an engineer, architectural books keep telling me that Jesse’s work was extraordinary. But I can see that actually his work was short sighted and he seemed a hard, driven man, although because he achieved things, we overlook that. I’ll analyse what he built on my other blog.

I want to ask WHY Jesse Harley created so many new docks, on top of the 18th Century set which saw so much slave trade. A Liverpool superlative it should not be proud of is that it was Europe’s leading slave port; and it sent at least 10 times the human cargo ships that Bristol and London did. When Albert Dock opened, the slave trade had been outlawed in Britain for 40 years. Yet the port thrived on the produce it had made, and the produce of domestic slavery which continued in America till c1860. I was also surprised to learn that in Britain and its empire, slavery needed a second act, passed in 1834, to actually grind it to a halt, which wasn’t immediate.

Whilst we celebrate the names of those to whom we attribute slavery’s abolition, perhaps even they need scrutiny. William Wilberforce didn’t advocate immediate emancipation – he said slaves needed to be prepared for freedom. Resocialised, don’t you mean? Sometimes, they had to work for a generation first.

There is another very evil fact about slavery that I’ll end with. I had to walk round my home to take it in.

But my point for now is that Liverpool’s connection to slavery was around the time that policing began, and so did those new docks; and at a time of unbridled trading worldwide – two acts in the 1830s and 40s meant its ships could travel without restriction, and its profits were therefore unfettered.

What of the local workers – in factories and docks? Would they be considered working under modern slavery conditions?

I was also learned why these warehouses were built. London had a new kind of dock. Liverpool was encouraged to get some too. These enclosed docks where you could moor right by the secure warehouses meant that

1) the rich merchants lost far less of their goods to theft (or fire) 

2) the HM customs people could check and collect more easily.

Ah. Now we know why central government was involved.

And you’ll note that Jesse Harley’s designs included not only a huge wall (see why thoughts on walls here) to keep out, but police booths. Note their arrow slit motif and castle-like quality.

I don’t support looting, but I do wonder if some of the looters were those who couldn’t buy shoes.

Liverpool was also a port where people sailed for a new life to America. If you’ve seen The Golden Door, you’ll know it wasn’t such a land of the free and opportunity – more of a work force advert. Customs in New York were utterly brutal and degrading, in the name of health. But this also meant that further immigration occurred in Liverpool – mostly outgoing.

So yes, police were about keeping ‘rabble’ quiet and money in the right places.

I’ll also briefly touch on the fact that Catholic Emancipation happened at this time, and some further Church of England strangleholds on public office were released to non Anglicans.

Is it an accident then that policing was created in this era?

My shocking final fact: HMRC tweets that modern British tax payers helped end the African slave trade – we were paying for the compensation to the slave OWNERS til 2015!

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Pentecost: Parallel Spirits

Brace yourself Nessies, this is 3000 words

I’ve moved Pentecost this year – officially. Because I was still wearing my indigo outfit on Sunday, to see a friend who loves purple. “I’m glad you thought me more important than the Holy Spirit,” she said, clad in red. I think that the Holy Spirit and Indigo are very much connected, this year especially.

Despite being a lifelong Christian, I’m new to the quirks of the high church calendar, and expected Pentecost to be this coming Sunday. Harder of course, when there are no churches to go to to be reminded. Hence I wasn’t really ready – and then something happened on Pentecost night…

Last year was the first time that I discovered the tradition of wearing red on Pentecost to emulate the flames of the Holy Spirit which rested on the disciples’ heads. I feel that red isn’t very representative of flames and felt that orange and yellow should be included. So I went to a high church dressed like a lollipop, replete with matching lipstick. By night I attended an interdenominational meeting at the local cathedral. I was delighted to see a screen – not of the rood and pulpitum kind – and band instruments. I enjoyed the sight of cape clad stewards with heads in their hands whilst we raised ours. I met another Elspeth – a rare event – but she soon left me to stand at the back so that she could wave her hands more.

I wondered if putting my hands above hockey height – not something that churches I attend encourage – does actually give you an experience of the Spirit. Alas not I, but then the music didn’t really move me. Others seemed to be straight in there, as if programmed by familiar songs, pulsing with bliss. I confess that my bliss came from a sense of wickedness.

No one there was dressed in red. No one I spoke to understood why I was. Was I the only person who’d seen incense that morning?

I like to go between traditions, and not just the ends of the Christian candle. Candles are used by everyone. Pagans too…

I feel it is my calling to go between different expressions of faith, and especially to be a bridge between Woo Woo and traditional Christians. Which disciples of Jesus among you would listen to the dispensations of the Magenta Pixie? She has especial words, which I discovered at Pentecost. Please let me share them.

If you’re expecting Angela Rippon creations of the garden variety, you’ll be disappointed. The avatar of the said Pixie is more coral than magenta. I do like to describe colours accurately. If you do too, you might be just who I’m looking for at Between the Stools (I’m peppering my articles with hints).

The Magenta Pixie, a spirit channel, was speaking about resetting global finances, and a little known American agreement due to be ratified on 11th September 2001 called NESARA. There is also a global version, about forgiving all debts and free energy. It’s time for that to come to pass, saith the Pixie. Important stuff – but I was concerned that this website that the Pixie chose for her message, The Golden Age of Gaia, seemed to have rushed ahead with statements and timelines for the new age.

It is vital that we all participate and that no-one takes upon themselves – not governments, universities, think tanks, churches, or communities of Goddesses – to tell us when universal Citizens’ Income and medicare is coming in and that a new worldwide financial agreement has been made.

I’ll speak more about this another time, but I won’t hide that I very much wish to be part of creating a new world – it is a calling I’ve long been aware of. Perhaps some of you reading this feel that too. And all of us will live in this post viral world, so we should have at least the opportunity to have a say. Vast distant systems being imposed on us – even by celestial beings – is not what the Aquarian Age is about. (If you’re a Christian, you can think of it as the 1000 Years of Peace in Revelation).

In my woo woo diet of late, I’d been reading about a particular chef who I shan’t name, whose dishes I had found healthful. But then I discovered a recipe on the OMTimes about the new world being brought to birth which made me choke.

I have and will continue to speak against technology which harms. It’s what I’ve feared for a long time and could see how this virus could be used to make more of it. Again, this will feature more in another post – Lead Us Not Into Technocracy (from my Lord’s Prayer for our times).

But it’s relevant to today because it’s about a new era and the Spirit helpers descending to us to assist us. Jesus left behind his Spirit which came that day, recorded in the book of Acts.

I’m reading 2 books about Mary Magdalene, one of my favourite people. The Jews of that first century AD (not that they knew it was AD yet) expected and hoped for this Messiah to save them and for a new era that alleviated them from oppression. Their most obvious oppression was the Romans who occupied them, and so much of the world at that time. Jesus did indeed preach and usher in a new kingdom, assisted by Mary, but not of the sort they expected, nor in the way they expected.

New wine into old wineskins is a topic to develop more later – but it relates to my public critique of the Anglican church (see tag cloud), which I feel is very analogous to the Judaism described in these novels. The rules for rules sake; the rules that stop you doing good; the rules which are quick to exclude and punish. And it’s not just the church, but secular society which creates ever more laws. In my country, laws were rushed through at the outbreak which curtail liberties and rights, such as making it easier to section people (relevance to covid? That should set off alarms). This would be relevant to Mary’s story too… She’ll get a post for her day in July, and so will ‘mental health’.

But I’m seeing that we need spiritual helpers as we face oppression – from our own governments and systems, the Romans of our time, fighting this ‘invisible enemy’…although conspiracy theorists say that description matches the Illuminati as much as the virus.

My Woo Woo friends tell me that we indeed have such helpers – not only are lightworkers born onto the earth in large numbers for this ascension, but that spirit guides, such as angels and other discarnate beings, are very willing to aid us.

Mainstream Christians would say that the Holy Spirit is ever with us, and yes we have angels although unless you’re high church, you’re not encouraged to address anyone outside of the Trinity.

But I’m afraid about the idea of improvement from some New Age types. Returning to that OMTimes article… we are told that we’ll have to sacrifice privacy for this better world.

Brakes screech to a halt. If you’re wanting an end to injustice and inequality, you do not sacrifice privacy. Privacy erosion is a feature of dystopia. (Not that I think much to Thomas Moore’s Utopia, having read it last year). Our homes, our bodies, our belongings, our thoughts and beliefs are our own.

This same article spoke of robot nurses to avoid healthcare workers getting infected! Yes I can see the concern that of course has been faced round the world, but I also query the narrative about infection levels, and also that our state mainstream medical model is the right or the only one. I have often said that by stopping other modalities from working during the lockdown, it’s not only made those practitioners poor, but taken away patient choice, and deprived us of the very kinds of healing that are most efficacious.

What our modern world and this virus is depriving us of is People Contact. Loneliness has been as much of a problem as the virus. I don’t want to be served by a machine, in a library, in a shop. And I certainly don’t want medical care from one. Many of us find robots eerie. Our online systems are paranoid about robots – stopping those browsers who protect their privacy – but in the non virtual world, we are being encouraged to accept these monstrosities. I say a very clear NO.

The same post also was celebrating, or at least accepting, that much more of our world will be virtual and controllable, including our health.

Again, health will get more detailed posts in the future, but I was horridly disturbed by the idea of being centrally watched in my home. I’ve seen NHS studies on the ‘wonders’ of smart meters being able to watch when I sit and when I rise (isn’t that the Lord’s prerogative? It’s comforting about Him, not about my national health service). Hence, if I am deemed to be depressed, and I get up in the night, you can see that I’ve a sleep (or bladder) issue and alter my medicine accordingly.

Hence I hate smart meters, which not only pump out dangerous EMFs, but allow me to be controlled remotely – but I am not a video! I am also against 5G which facilitates this, and to which I will devote at least a whole post.

The new age self help movement often speak of not giving your power away, but this is doing exactly that!

I’ve heard Christians say that the Holy Spirit is a gentleman; you have to accept him into you heart to become a Christian; and if you’re Pentecostally minded, that to receive gifts of the spirit, you must accept and be open. He (she actually – the Greek is female) won’t force her heavenly language upon you. This is going to put the snake’s tail in its mouth…

Permission is something we’re hot on, or should be. We’re supposed to ask permission in intimate acts of all kinds. I’ve heard Pagans opine about the importance of permission in touching or in opting in… and yet our technological world wants to erode that. Permission was meant to be at the heart of the European General Data Protection Regulations of 2018, although in effect it’s not given the individual much real control. Being heavy about signatures which hand over rights that you don’t choose is meaningless. I had this out, post GDPR, with the Financial Ombudsman service. Cookies have become “we’re just telling you we’re setting them” for many websites – which is not legal or right. If you ask for permission to do something, the answer has to feasibly be NO. Like, when I was eating my lunch and a smoker sat next to me and said, Do you Mind. Yes. (So don’t or smoke elsewhere.) She thought I’d just assent. Consent means we can say yes or no.

So what’s this got to do with Pentecost? This is a tongue of fire new era, with special healers, human and divine.

And consent has to be at the heart of a decent world. One World, but not One World Order. I note that the dreaded Cabal that the woo wooers speak of, and the technologies that some praise, act in much the same way.

The Spirit won’t come into our hearts unless we ask; the angels won’t step in – even to those of faith – unless we especially call on them. And yet, 5G would foist on us a system we may not choose, with energies running through our homes which affect those that we live near (including animals). It’s help we may not ask for, but we’re being monitored by people that are ever more faceless – such as the customer care for this blog – and hard to reach.

This is not an improved world, it’s what I’m fighting to stop.

That OM article, sought out during a challenging day, depressed me. For I felt – have I thus far survived to emerge in such a world? Someone else said, many of us won’t live to see this new age. So we do the hard graft of making it, suffering the old and its death throes, only to hand it over to children?

But I cheered myself up with these statements, and I hope that they encourage you too.

None of us know how long we’ll live but it’s possible that we will share the world with generations that come after us, even outlive them. Of course we should think of those who come next, but not to negate our own lives for children. It’s particularly galling for those who don’t have children. So yes we may well see the fruits of our planting, and we should all have the opportunity to plant and to plan the garden.

I also realised that many don’t want this world where the unseen swoops in to intervene. I’m not alone in resisting it.

Free will is at the heart of all spiritual interactions. Any light transmission, movie about God or angels I’ve seen, theological discourse, says: We can’t help unless you ask.

So this technopolis is not an improvement, and it’s immature. I refer you back to my Tough Love and Nannying piece. This is super spooky nannying. It forgets the medical traditions which gave rise to our cultures and to the Woo Woo movement. Why is non allopathic medicine known as complementary, and has to give medical disclaimers to say “This is no replacement for your doctor”? Why give so much power to this relatively young and localised health regime, instead othe older and wiser ones which have survived for many centuries and enjoy a resurgence?

The OM article also mentioned capitalism, as if it were a necessary and helpful invention needed at a time of crisis and change. It is exactly what is wrong with our world. Christians might want to say it’s Satan or the human heart, but if I had to put it down to a system, it’s the C word. Again, many alternatives are seeking an alternative from that system which they call the broken masculine, the 3D way. This is what our Spirit helpers are here to address, and the virus is meant to break.

We’re not meant to go back to what we had or to start a worse system.

And… yes this has been a super snaky one today… but I said that the snake’s tail would end in its mouth. It was the Light Code transmissions which I discovered on Pentecost that I wanted to speak of as my final point and my link between Woo Woo and Christians. Today, the gifts of the Spirit fell upon the apostles, and charismatic Christians say that we can have these – prophecy, healing, discernment, casting out evil, and tongues too. Indeed, I believe that and some people are living that.

But I found out that tongues aren’t just an evangelical protestant Christian phenomena. I discovered a Catholic Priestess whom I love – I have the honour of reviewing her Mary Magdalene book – who speaks in tongues. I think it’s a mark of mysticism.

I came across the work of Sandra de Vos. I laid on my bed for a healing where I’d be bombarded with light codes coming through sound. It recalled Speaking In Tongues! Although this wasn’t as calm as tongues – the last time I heard these, it was very soothing and I didn’t care that I didn’t understand what was being said. It always sounds a bit Hebrew, but that’s maybe because to Western ears, Hebrew feels an exotic, unfamiliar language. It isn’t Hebrew or any known earth speak.

I hope this isn’t unPC – it’s meant to be quite the reverse – but some of the noises made in the Light Codes recalled not only animals, but humans that we might call challenged.

I have begun to suspect that these beings are actually advanced and that what we consider to be unskilled or unintelligent communication is literally the language of angels. We just haven’t tuned into them yet. I note how birdsong and crickets and waves and whales appear in relaxing healing music, infused (I’m learning) with divine codes of healing, light and profound messages in multi layers.

So next time, dear Pentecostal friends (are you still here?) a cessationalist brethren or sethern challenges your holy babble and says, what’s the point? Without an interpreter you’re doing no good… say that this is God using you as a channel for light codes beyond our current level of understanding. Or as Sandra de Vos says, you’re a Cosmic Microphone. For the Lord. I think that it’s no accident that this phenomenon of tongues reappeared in decades of change as we moved towards ascension…

And it’s these languages these codes these awarenesses that we need to get into our reign of peace.

We also need to understand diversity… like seeing those people we thought as disabled, something to fix or pity, or less valuable, as some of our most profound beings who have a special role. We need to learn to celebrate them and to learn to communicate. This 5G health model would impose more normative standards on us, which is an aberration of true wellbeing.

Hence, I have to say, such proponents are not entirely the old souls that they claim to be.

But it’s OK to be a rosy and green apple. I am. I’m willing to fix my worm holes – and I think that celestial sound is a vital part of that – listening to it, channelling it… the the other worldly, not so logical and empirical voice, the still small voice.

I hope that by my facetiousness, I’ve gotten different belief systems to listen to each other.

I have another Goddess Message to share soon.

And the title of course is a reference to my novel.

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Creative Maladjustment Week

This is based on a Martin Luther King speech who said “Here is a list of horrible things in our world which I’m glad to be maladjusted to, and I won’t be changing that”. He resisted being “normal” as officially defined (especially by psychiatry) and said we need a new group to improve our world, the creatively maladjusted. This international week celebrates that spirit, and here’s its website.

Here’s what I am proud to be maladjusted to:

– Benefits claimant hating, as incited by media and certain political parties; the belief that your worth comes from how much taxable income you generate

– Banks that can create theoretical money and make actual debts to chase you for, even or especially when you’re poor, and cause global crises that others both suffer and pay for

– a health system that’s as much about supply and demand and control as it really is about wellness, and which sees other forms of healing – often older and more universal – as a threat to be derided and blocked; a system that can make decisions on your behalf for ‘your good’ which affect your life and body and mind

– a world where governments and corporations try to own and control people and pry and don’t treat people as people and where other forms of life are only given value by what they profit other humans

– a world where we have judgment and fear, not acceptance, towards those who are different from us, whether that be due to nationhood, skin colour, beliefs, sexuality, gender, bodily ability

– a world where we are disseminated to and encouraged to ridicule or silence those who don’t agree with and expose and question the beliefs that those in control would like us to absorb

– a world of secrecy and control of the few, often masquerading as a people led open advanced society

– invasive customs control based on exaggerated threats; wars on terror justified through fear but which really have some hidden benefit for the few whilst causing more terror for those who we claim to protect

And campaigns to glorify and justify war, past and present

You know my flags by now – justice and liberty for all! And most important – Love.

Here is a big wave of them along with all those other CMs!

 

 

 

 

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Candid Friend of the Green Party

Church historian Diarmaid MacCulloch sat in his home parish church (mine too) and said to camera that he is a “candid friend of Christianity”. I am too, but I am also the candid friend of the Green Party.

I’ve often found their website an interesting slant on news and opinions, and I found their response to events like the Boston Bombings and the Woolwich attack balanced and sensitive. I was sorry that they’ve kept up the fracking and 20 mile an hour speed limits news over commenting on the PRISM revelations (the same is true of the Socialist worker, whose views cannot be called balanced, but I like to hear from a range of people). With two welcome trials in Britain this week about security overstepping on the public toe, I hopefully peeked on the Green website to see what Mses Bennett, Lucas and friends such as the newly titled Jenny Jones might have to say against the Big Brotherism I felt confident they’d oppose. Instead, I found an article that made my eyes bulge…

Am I reading the Mail?! I asked, or my local rag? No – Green Leader Natalie, who I admire, was worrying about obesity, saying it requires “Political Will” to tackle – as per her leader’s blog of 30 Aug 2013.

My understanding is that the worldwide Greens are concerned with having freedom and supporting diversity; in devolving laws to the lowest possible level and not having intrusive and unnecessary ones. Which makes me think that they are against nanny state…oh, but aren’t those slow car laws are a bit controlling?!

What size and shape we are is NOT an issue for the government. The Greens rightly value all colours of the rainbow on the gender/sexuality continuum; they want freedom of belief, they hate racism and any other discrimination.

But this about obesity is controlling, value judging, discrimination! (everything the Greens are against).

When this country, like so many others, is in the pits of austerity, when this country, like so many others, is waging unnecessary wars, when this country is in the midst of revelations that it is being routinely spied on and laws are being passed to make protest harder, then the Greens, as the most radical and critiquing of our parties, the one who claims to be different, ought to be busy with these matters.

I’m sure another allopathic medicine diatribe (sorry that should say discourse) is due soon on this blog, though my Diana and Hannah post gives a flavour of my thoughts on that subject which I can explain more fully another time. But I think, as regards to our weight and size, I can do no better than refer readers to

http://voices.yahoo.com/in-defence-obesity-2630233.html

Who called the fat police? And who recruited Natalie Bennett?! Please resign your badge and get back to your better battles!

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