Tag Archives: justice

An open letter to Christians about covid

Dear friends, sisters and brothers in the Lord

I write to urgently awaken you.

During this past year, I am alarmed not only by what is happening in the name of stopping viral spread, but that churches are not only complying, but promoting it.

A politican told me she wanted to protect lives; I said I wish to protect life, one worth living – the sort that Jesus came to give us. But there is not much living to the full in this…

Like many, I was suspicious from the onset that this was really a worldwide pandemic which merited the measures – ie, restrictions – placed upon us all.

I soon realised that I was in good company.

I’ve read and heard the work of so many whistleblowers around the world, including experts in science and medicine, such as Michael Yeadon, Wolfgang Wodarg, Sherri Tenpenny, who blast the mathematical modelling used to lock us all down (modeller Neil Ferguson is disgraced) and state that no virus is this virulent. I’ve watched Judy Mikovits in the documentary Plandemic – a narrative agreed with by a growing number. I have read the open letter signed by 1969 Belgian doctors against the portrayal of the virus and the measures used against it. I have heard the testimony of doctors coerced and even bribed into putting covid onto a death certificate and in using ventilators, which often are the cause of death. I have read about the germ theory driving our health models, discredited even by its own inventor, Louis Pasteur, but which is the lucrative and controlling model (note the many policy makers with shares and other financial interests in pharmaceuticals).

And so many more that I have pages of references and links to studies internationally.

I have also heard repeatedly that the intrusive, dangerous test used to identify covid, Polymerase Chain Reaction, is not fit for purpose; at 45 cycles of amplification, which we use in Britain, it is well over any meaningful scientific limit and anything can be found: traces of previous dead viruses and genetic material we all have. Hence the results are 90% unreliable.

I know that people who registered but didn’t take the test received letters that they had tested positive. The inventor of the original PCR test died last year, but he said that was not ever meant to be a diagnostic tool. It is used as an instrument of fear to drive up statistics and justify fresh restrictions.

I note that many of these scientists are discredited and that their work goes missing from the internet, and ‘fact checking’ has become an excuse to censor those who disagree with a pre-set narrative. London Real’s host Brian Rose was told that YouTube had a policy about the virus a year ago – before covid-19 was supposed to have started, but it was at the time of Event 201, a conference involving the Wellcome Trust and linked to Bill Gates, where a document was produced by WHO called ‘World At Risk’ (on their website) talking of a planned ‘live exercise’ in ‘global health security’. With other international groups’ agenda (such as WEF and IMF) involving economic reset and technological rollout it becomes plain that this is a plan to move us all into a worldwide all-seeing dependent totalitarianism driven by technocracy, not democracy.

Police have also begun whistleblowing: an open letter to New South Wales commissioner in Australia was recently delivered, by Cops For Covid Truth, via their lawyer Peter Little. These 70 officers realised that not only do the medical facts not tie up, but that they are pawns in bringing in tyranny, and their orders are against their oaths and fundamental law. The original signatories have been joined by many others around the world.

Among the myriad medical frontline staff similarly exercised is British nurse Kate Shemirani, who is a Christian, who has spoken out at large gatherings against lockdowns, testing, tracing and masks. The first has caused untold suffering on every level; the second, mostly false postives giving an excuse for the third, which can lead to arbitrary containment; and the last deprives wearers of oxygen, traps them with germs and lowers immunity, whilst offering no protection (virus particles are smaller than mask material) – all it does for others is obfuscates connection and makes us featureless. I’ve seen the burn-like skin damage caused by mask wearing. I’ve been directly told that putting a tube behind a mask on the face for 4 minutes gave off the chart [was it carbon monoxide or dioxide?] readings – making it like a hazardous room that isn’t safe to enter. There are urgent warnings, such as from Dr Margarite Griesz-Brisson, that mask wearing causes permanent lung, heart and brain damage and is especially harmful to children. Indeed, there are reports of their collapse. Some didn’t get up.

And then, there’s the vaccine. The alternative media is increasingly filled with doctors such as Carrie Madej, Christiane Northrup and David Martin telling us that the ‘vaccine’ is unsafe; that this new type which involves toxin coated foreign bodies hasn’t been tested; it isn’t a vaccine, it’s a device; that it can watch and even remotely control and release other substances into you; one of the manufacturers, Moderna, admits that it’s an operating system in the body with updates; that it can sterilise or cause shut down; that people injected are still infected; that those who receive it often collapse – the UK has resuscitation units by vaccine admininstration centres; that severe adverse reactions have even caused health officials to withdraw certain batches. Some have swiftly died. I have seen screenshots of medical abstracts on how to vaccinate via any orifice unknowingly.

We have to ask: why is this posited as the only protection and cure? Why – and who – is vaccination so heavily invested in? Why are we pressured to have it to the point of possible exclusion from, work, study, services, and a whole new ID and passport industry springing up around it? And why are internet giants involved in medicine? Why are those who raise alarms about it so viciously and often childishly attacked?

Kate is not the only Christian who has considered it her duty to speak out. Catholic priests Carlo Maria Vigano and Robert Altiers have courageously done so; Archbishop Carlo has spoken of not only of the Deep State, but Deep Church. Evangelical nonconformists run campaigns to stop the unlawful mandates – such as Peggy Hall of The Healthy American, or churches like Cap Bap in Washington DC who sued over the fact they can’t meet in person. In New York, the governor threatened to close churches and synagogues which didn’t comply with his ever more draconian and nonsensical rules. He too received negative press coverage and law suits. “This man is not God, he will answer to Him,” one reader raged.

Yet here in the UK, I have generally seen acquiescence from churches, who have not realised the difference between guidance and law (often it is the former, which can’t be enforced) and not even made room for the government’s own exceptions, such as with face coverings. They have allowed governments to render them ‘nonessential’.

Instead, the Anglican church especially have added their own stipulations to worshippers.

It does not seem to have seen that the laws used for coronavirus measures are spurious, for they clash with all 30 of the articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and every country’s constitution. These are inalienable, regardless of ‘emergencies’ – and if no real state of emergency exists, then the laws such as our Coronavirus 2020 which are appended to a previous act – note the year, 1984 – are null and void. They have also expired.

There is an international class action law suit being prepared by Reiner Füllmich. He and his Coronavirus Investigative Committee deem these events – which many see as genocide and fraud, unconsenting experimentation and surveillance – as crimes against humanity.

There is also God’s law, which supersedes all others. Discussing Romans 13 takes a sermon – I just wrote one on it – but many see that passage as not supporting blind obedience to unjust earthly authorities: quite the reverse. Indeed many Bible heroes suffered imprisonment and death for what they preached. Peter – central to those of established traditions – refuses in Acts 4 and 5 to stop teaching about Jesus and healing in his name.

And yet, we….

In previous pandemics, churches were not ordered to close. In the 17th C plague, vicars took risks to be with their flock, even the ones who were banned from their pulpits by the Act of Uniformity. We are now seeing government interference in Christian worship on that scale, but the church has gone online, not into the world, and I’ve seen few offers of help or condolence, and no Christian group in Britain questioning these laws.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer spoke out against the established church of his country for acquiescing, if not abetting, Nazism. Of course, acquiescing – even tacitly – is abetting.

I wonder what he would say now to the established churches, the big international chains.

We may have believed that we were being responsible in stopping the spread by closing our doors, by insisting on masks and being distant, by using harmful sanitizer (look on the side of the bottle at the warnings!), and participating in contact tracing.

We may think that putting others first is Christian, but Jesus said: Love your neighbour AS yourself. Not more than, instead of you. This sacrifical rhetoric is being used to manipulate.

It is clear that this is really about mass surveillance, designed to be a new way of life, and the collection of genetic material. Heathrow is already trialling digital health passports and Ticketmaster is floating the idea of needing proof of testing and vaccination to attend their  events. Britain passed a law in October stating that which is obtained via test and trace will be kept for national security. Denmark passed a law making vaccination mandatory on pain of arrest and being excluded from society. Into 2021, I see more articles about colleges and countries developing, if not requiring these. Camps are being built, which should chill us, and people removed from homes who are deemed to be ill. Clearly their real ‘threat’ is something else. China already runs biometric recognition and a social credit score, determining what prices you pay and what you can do, depending on your compliance. British austerity has also punished – I know its victims. We already have fiscal credit rating.

It is time to awaken, to put on armour, to slumber no more.

It is not just conservative Christians seeing this: Neo Pagans and New Agers, and those without a faith, are seeing it too… the legal irregularities underlying a sham and corrupt system, the cure worse than the malady, the rife censorship that cannot even argue well. Despite our differences in belief, even among Christians, we need to rise.

Along with Dietrich, one other quote spoke to me. It was from doctor Rashid Battar, whose military experience gives him cause for urgent concern as much as his medical training.

He said: what will our grandchildren say of the adults of 2020?

Where were they? Why didn’t they do something? Why have we inherited such a world?

I want to be able to stand before successive generations and my God and say:

I stood up, even if it was a risk.

It isn’t only Black Lives Matter who say ‘silence is violence’.

There is coming a new earth, and the old order is passing away.

The side of Light and Love has already won; we battle a vanquished foe but we should be battling, for this is a medical problem, but also a spiritual one.

It is clear that dark forces are using this virus for another end.

Allowing our society to be broken down for a virus no more virulent than flu, and to have our right to corporate (and corporeal) worship removed is not something that God will say ‘Well done, good and faithful servant’ to us for.

Reiner Füllmich is evoking the term from the Nuremberg trials. Yes, we are comparable – even greater, especially if this goes where many fear it will. It may seem incredible, uncomfortable, but think of those 18th century tea drinkers who had to face where their sugar came from; the Germans of the 1940s who realised what was happening to their neighbours… and so many other points of history. We are at such a point.

What will future generations and our God say of us and what we did and didn’t do?

I will stand and be counted – friends and siblings, will you stand with me?

Just one of so many links: https://worlddoctorsalliance.com/ including a fully referenced 19 page open letter and many articles, such as from the executive editor of the BMJ

There is also further material on this blogand about what we can stand together to do

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Message from a Goddess

As I opened my emails this morning, I was lured by the subject, accompanied by hearts, of “message from an Egyptian goddess”. My first Goddess communication! I rescued this from my junk folder (what does Microsoft know?) and delightedly dived in.

Brought up Baptist, I’m not very familiar with Egyptian deities, although I am reading about some at the moment. This is lion-headed Sekhmet; and the sender, Published Priestess Astara of Flower of Life Press, had visited her temple in person just prior to lockdown. She stood before this dark 7 foot statue (is that with or without the big halo-douche bag on her head?) and received this message:

“Daughter, you are here to bring forth my Code—my Compassion AND my Fierce Warrior to the people during these times of great need. You were made for this, Belovedevery step you’ve taken has led you to this moment. You’ve released and become empty so you can now receive from me. Go forth and BE an emissary of Divine Mother’s Love—an anointing Priestess of the Light! This is your sacred work. Claim it! Say YES! Your gifts are sorely needed NOW as so many hearts break open from loss, death, rage, and fear. You know that the crack allows in the light, and that the light can expand and shine the vibration of love that the earth needs. This is how you are to spread itlove will catch on like a virus as you shine your light and bring forth the Voices of Change so together you can usher in a New Earth Paradigm of Love.

Wow indeed. Now I felt my not quite knees go weak like Astara’s, but a special zap that said, you were meant to read this today. I think this message is for daughters and sons, whoever reads this and thinks – yes this is me. This is my calling.

Although I have a lifelong faith, I’m not used to hearing from hybrid beings, nor via statues, and so it was significant for me to receive word via such an unfamiliar figure. But I do feel that the God I’m used to definitely comes in female, and encompasses forms and cultures that I’m not used to. In fact, that book about Egypt says that angels I know are also deities I don’t. Sekhmet in her many guises stands for healing, harmony, balance, intuition – and breaking down to build anew.

I like the Fierce Warrior part. I am, I declare, a fierce woman. I have a saying (especially for those who have only experienced my previous more docile persona) that

I used to be biddable, but now I’m formidable.

And

The Fear of the Lord and Elspeth is the fountain of life

Yes, I am facetious, wicked and unapologetic. And did I mention – fierce!

When it comes to injustice, micro or macro, I am that lioness (I’d prefer to have a mane).

But I hope too that I can also be compassionate and loving (I do struggle sometimes with all this love talk, which I’ll be taking up soon). I also baulked at the emptiness. Yes, I can relate to feeling empty. I’m used to a rather different deity telling me to empty myself so he can pour in – or that’s what his servants tell me. But I always resisted it. This sounds a big headed god who wants vacuous vessels to pour into – isn’t that close to brainwashing and what some people fear is happening with this virus?

Isn’t that how indoctrination works? I’m learning that this isn’t The One True God.

I did feel truth when I read this message – yes, in the cerise font I use here – and whether or not I directly address douche bag deities, I do feel that my God spoke when that email was sent out.

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Middlemarch and Sherwood

What links a Lincoln green clad arrow pinger, a mine magnate’s niece who’s chased by horses and her teacher, and a bonnet wearing philanthropic clergyman’s wife?

If you’ve read the blurb to my novel, you’ll know that I like making unlikely comparisons. If you’ve read the rest of this blog, you will see more of them.

The answer to the first question is firstly geography – for they are all located in the East Midlands; secondly, literature and film; – and lastly – well off people fighting to support the cause of the poor.

Thus Sherwood and Eastwood and Middlemarch are not so far apart.

I wrote my thoughts on Eastwood’s famous son – and the escapades of Ursula Brangwen – on Good Reads.

The rest of this concentrates on Sherwood – whose forest’s inhabitants need no introduction – and the fictitious manufacturing town invented by George Eliot, filmed in Stamford.

I like to read and watch and visit in themes, so if you want to know what my days out to Nottinghamshire and Stamford (and elsewhere in the East Midlands) involved – read them here.

Robin Hood and Dorothea Brooke are further linked by the fact that they are in some ways superhuman archetypes. Robin is borderline superhero, and in some versions (such as 1980s TV series Robin of Sherwood) he has a higher calling from a deity, the son of a god, the fulfilment of a long promised title: he is, as the theme song goes, The Hooded Man. (Does anyone else find the otherwise excellent Clannad’s keyboards tinny and dated?). Dorothea – ‘of the gods’ – is likened to not only famous mystic and theologian Theresa of Avila, but saints, angels and the Virgin Mary. (I ruefully acknowledge that Schmoop pointed that out to me).

Robin too has a special Mary in his all male band of called followers, who live rough and itinerant and give, in their way, good news to the poor and freedom for the prisoners and the oppressed… strange how closely Robin’s mission matches Isaiah 61, Jesus’ own self confessed mission statement. Robin descends from the higher echelons to save the people.

Dorothea also cares about the poor, about justice – and mercy – letting sheep stealers off fatal sentences, providing better homes for tenants, doing good with her money, such as supporting overlooked but genuine clergy and would be world changing doctors.

Both though are truly human as well as divine.

There is much in common with 1195 – the years leading to Magna Carter, 1832 – the Reform Bill – and now. All these are the cusp of a sea change  against long oppression and imbalance. Hence these stories keep coming round again. The 2006 BBC Robin Hood (with Jonas Armstrong) made explicit parallels to the middle eastern wars funded at the expense of the poor and where fair justice was dispensed with, and that there was no need to travel to Arab countries to see evil – “the real cancer is right here”.

Hence my satisfaction that seemingly disparate reading and watching material has a common thread.

I’ll talk more about Middlemarch in my next piece, but I wanted to round up by a final parallel which is more than pedantry.

It’s about accents in the TV versions.

In his otherwise excellent site Bold Outlaw, Allen W. Wright says that Kevin Costner’s infamously poor/non English accent in the 1994 Prince of Thieves film doesn’t matter, because we don’t know how people talked in Robin Hood’s day, and some say that the modern American accent is more likely than today’s English one.

As a North American, he would say that.

As an English person, I feel that Americans not adopting the accent of the characters they play is not only cultural laziness but symptomatic of America becoming a synecdoche for all the English speaking western world. If actors of other nationalities play an American part, they change their voice – but not in reverse. Many dramas exported to America are remade, or redubbed.

Only one Robin Hood so far has used the right accent for Robin, going by what we today recognise as Nottinghamshire, and that again is the 2006 BBC series with Richard Armitage.

All the others do what Middlemarch also did – as well as so many films. The rich have a British gittish queen’s English accent, and the serfs and villagers and tradesfolk have the general lazy west country bumpkin voice that I have moaned about so many times. It’s not even true of the West Country! It’s not how people in the Midlands speak. And that accent serves to delineate class via accent and associate the country one with being not only rustic but stupid, poor, ill educated, lower, subordinate.

Thus class – a distinction and divide that Robin and Dorothea are working to erase – is demarcated for yet another era, and that shorthand is perpetuated and spread across not only Britain but all the countries who watch our dramas.

I shall be back with more about Middlemarch (or truly, Lowick and Tipton) shortly.

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Compassion – Hanna(h)s and the Holocaust

I revisited The Reader, the film that finally saw Kate Winslet get her Oscar – as Ricky Gervais predicted, it was about the holocaust. There’s been other such observations (such as in new film The Congress) that this most sensitive subject, often cited as the greatest horror of this or any time, garners recognition.

I shared my initial thoughts on Bernhard Schlink’s tale – five years on, I stand by them all. I had further thoughts on the writing, which in neither case (book nor script) was perfect, but that’s not the focus of this post. You can see them on my Amazon reviews.

The impression that left me with was the assumption that awfulness and shame is the only response that Germans leave themselves for the events of and around World War II; that it is beyond forgiveness, and to attempt it is offensive to Jews – and I again point out that they were one of at least 4 groups (gay, gypsy, disabled too) who were targeted.

There is nothing to be learned, says the daughter who was in the fire and in concentration camps. In the film, Hanna Schmidt says it after her 20 years in prison, before taking her life. Neither party is allowed to grow; the whole story is about stagnant people, in victimhood and guilt. Although I am aware that what holocaust victims endured is something many of us have no idea of, I think all of us have experienced suffering and therefore am not unqualified to suggest that it is those darkest times especially where we see growth.

The Reader is about a court case of six SS guards. My response drifted from the legal response to – what would a counsellor or a minister say to these guards? Their business is not justice in the philosophical sense of logical wranglings, but of the heart.

Hannah Arendt is a film about a very similar subject – the 1960s trial of SS workers. This time, the trial is real and there is only one employee in the dock – an infamous senior one, and whose actions make far more sense to bring to court. (One of my criticisms of The Reader is that the church on fire was a case of manslaughter/Samaritan Law, not a war crime – the things the guards did which might have been weren’t the focus of the trial, thus weakening the premise). In both stories, the defendants are a synecdoche, standing for the vast army of SS workers during Nazi Germany, and the persons are made to represent a historic moment rather than the deeds of the individual.

Hannah Arendt was a German Jew who was captured in the war, and yet her attendance at the trial of Adolf Eichmann in Jerusalem yields more generous results than the immature fictional Michael Berg who was not implicated or involved in the camps – he wasn’t even born.

Both stories involve a defendant who seems to have lost their moral compass, and can only think in terms of their duty and orders. They cannot grasp their part in sending people to their death; it is a conveyor belt, and once they have done their part on the assembly line, they do not think about the next.

Hannah Arendt’s summation was that Eichmann’s lack of thinking was what made the atrocities he masterminded possible. It is true of Hanna Schmidt, the imaginary guard and lover of Michael in The Reader. Hanna doesn’t just not think, she can’t read; in learning, she faces some of her past by reading about the Holocaust, including Hannah Arendt’s. This hugely important point was left out of the film and Hanna is given even less scope for anything positive than in the book.

What most made me angry was that Kate Winslet, who I admire, said that if viewers sympathised with Hanna whom she played, they would (or should) feel morally compromised.

Wrong. You are never morally compromised for feeling compassion.

That means, to feel with: it is not about endorsing, just listening and empathy.

I again bring up my therapist and pastor, whose business it is not to condemn, but to facilitate a way back to wholeness. I again note how The Reader uses theological terms, which are actually from the legal – redeem, atone, justification, propitiation, expiation. They are ugly in pulpit and court; the two shouldn’t be conjoined.

What scares me most, what makes these stories relevant, is not perpetuating the suffering of the groups who were killed and the now remorseful perpetrators of the last world war. It is that the mindset that made that Nazi movement possible is still with us.

It starts with the milder things, with something that seems reasonable.

But I warn against creating enemies and unquestioning allegiances.

You are never just doing your job – you are never excused from thinking, or your conscience. Conscience is knowing with, and that is not a matter for only thought – it is a feeling, and intuition.

If your role takes away liberties, crushes, oppresses; if you are afraid to stand up to your employer – than something is gravely wrong and needs to be stopped. No contract should ever ask personal principles to come second to work.

It can be in smaller ways – random searches, taking or demanding money that causes poverty and fear; refusing an appeal. Many of us have opportunities and powers in this way. Thinking of them as papers or stats to clear, not as real people, is the first step. That’s how the army gets its staff to kill – targets are other, they are not like you. But this can be true of judges, police and enforcement, customs staff, welfare. Belle is the story of a judge who used his power well.

In small ways, we can begin that change: to refuse to act out of suspicion and prejudice, to break the chain of command which puts pressure on the next person, which uses fear to coerce. We can choose not to believe hype that would justify such actions.

If we never lose sight that the other person isn’t other, they’re a person, we could halt the fear and aggression and ensure dictatorships never again rise.

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Creative Maladjustment Week

This is based on a Martin Luther King speech who said “Here is a list of horrible things in our world which I’m glad to be maladjusted to, and I won’t be changing that”. He resisted being “normal” as officially defined (especially by psychiatry) and said we need a new group to improve our world, the creatively maladjusted. This international week celebrates that spirit, and here’s its website.

Here’s what I am proud to be maladjusted to:

– Benefits claimant hating, as incited by media and certain political parties; the belief that your worth comes from how much taxable income you generate

– Banks that can create theoretical money and make actual debts to chase you for, even or especially when you’re poor, and cause global crises that others both suffer and pay for

– a health system that’s as much about supply and demand and control as it really is about wellness, and which sees other forms of healing – often older and more universal – as a threat to be derided and blocked; a system that can make decisions on your behalf for ‘your good’ which affect your life and body and mind

– a world where governments and corporations try to own and control people and pry and don’t treat people as people and where other forms of life are only given value by what they profit other humans

– a world where we have judgment and fear, not acceptance, towards those who are different from us, whether that be due to nationhood, skin colour, beliefs, sexuality, gender, bodily ability

– a world where we are disseminated to and encouraged to ridicule or silence those who don’t agree with and expose and question the beliefs that those in control would like us to absorb

– a world of secrecy and control of the few, often masquerading as a people led open advanced society

– invasive customs control based on exaggerated threats; wars on terror justified through fear but which really have some hidden benefit for the few whilst causing more terror for those who we claim to protect

And campaigns to glorify and justify war, past and present

You know my flags by now – justice and liberty for all! And most important – Love.

Here is a big wave of them along with all those other CMs!

 

 

 

 

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The Lady, the Playwright and the Telepath

I have watched three films in short succession on oppressive regimes where freedom has been curtailed. One was a fictional story about a writer in East Germany, being spied on and censored by the secret police – something that happened to some of the cast of the film, one of whom died suddenly. This was the excellent Lives of Others or Die Leiben de Anderen. Then came The Lady, the Luc Besson film on Burma’s Aung San Suu Kyi, who spent the best part of 20 years under house arrest, unable to take her voted in position of leader because the military rulers did not wish it. Lastly was Salman Rushdie’s novel brought to the screen, Midnight’s Children, about the struggles of India to regain independence from British rule, and then its own battles under Indira Gandhi. In all these, interrogation, torture, imprisonment, death were unleashed upon those who would speak out against the regime.

 

And much of me felt grateful to have never lived in such circumstances, but also great sadness and anger at the injustice – one my country has not faced in living memory.

 

But as much as some of the horrors in these countries and others are things I cannot say are experienced here, I also felt fearful. For some of the issues indeed resounded: bans against public meetings; surveillance (ever easier with the internet) of subversives; people taking power against the people’s wishes and making policies that clash with the values of the country, but are overridden for ideological reasons in the name of the interests of the people; and those who stand up to it being bullied into silence.

 

Just a peek at recent news reveals abuses of growing police powers – infiltrating political groups and having sexual relationship to gain information; and then wanting this to be tried in secret courts – if at all. I don’t feel free and safe in my country, where there are camera on every street corner, police have powers for compulsory stop and search; where the law that is meant to be part of the bedrock of a just and equal society is often not allowing ordinary people to claim that justice; creating poverty and increasing the power and wealth of the rich; forcing people into effective slave labour if they are not working or in a way that the government sanctions; forcing mind and body altering operations without consent. Our votes don’t get us who and what we ask for, and petitions and letters are often ignored or met with standard, disinterested responses. We too encourage fear of certain groups that are deemed a threat to those in authority who can be searched and arrested for vague reasons.

 

Countries like the above might look to those of us who have a supposed developed and running democracy, a freedom of speech, and their hopes and battles are to make their countries more like ours. We should be ashamed that I am not sure any country could really be a model for fairness and liberty. We’ve allowed a global system of greed to take over; we settle conflicts with warfare, and perhaps none of us can really feel we trust our leaders to be doing what they say and doing the best for us. Is anywhere above corruption yet? I cannot say my country is.

 

We should make this the year that we all strive to be the kind of democracy that has and is still being fought for – truly a rule of the people, for the people, without fear of reprisal for speaking out and wanting something different, achieved without the violence that sadly has come with so many other struggles.  We want the world to follow an example of transparency, not be impressed by a veneer of deceit. What is the best kind of family – the one that rules by iron rod, or the one that supports its diverse children to grow, even if that means questioning the parents sometimes? For a true, strong leader can cope with questions; only the insecure and fearful try to quell the queriers.

 

I know what sort of country I’d like to live in, one that we all should strive for – and if even a shadow of this oppression resonates in our leaders, they need to be changing away from these old orders and into the fair, just and peaceful lands we all deserve and desire.

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Erotic Justice

This is the name of a book by Marvin M Ellison, an American academic theologian.

(I resisted the pun I could make about the title of my other blog on banking.)

I’ve taken this article down for now as I want to give the subject – kink/BDSM – some more thought before saying my public views. My initial reaction was confusion as to how eroticising acts of humiliation, subjugation and pain could be healthy and loving. I neither want to be judgemental or prudish, or to hurt those I may meet who are part of this world by seeming to reject and condemn them or at least, a part of them. But I also want to stand up for what I think too, and for principles I believe are important.

It’s a hard balance to strike, and I am not sure I have got it right yet.

(See the next post on Whistleblower for a related topic).

 

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Justice is restored but the chickens are gone

by me

I have been researching for my next post and I wanted to get it right. I have views on Poppy Day which passed before I had consolidated them. I had read various stories relating to war and the secret service, but also felt frankly afraid to voice them.

You will notice by now that I write against harmful systems and for justice and liberty. I am against control and propaganda. What I have to say this time particularly concerns those, linked by my unlikely sounding title.

‘Justice is restored’ refers to a missing statue. In that same town, something else that’s a known local feature has disappeared – the wild chickens who refused to move when their home became a roundabout on a busy bypass.

I saw a local news headline that ‘justice has been restored’, but then I wondered about that in larger terms. Each time I pick up a newspaper, I read something else which makes me angry because justice is being evaded or distorted. The people meant to protect justice curtail or suspend it for the citizens they are mean to be servants of. Policing of riots and protests; secret courts; laws coming in by a government we didn’t choose to make it ever harder for the public because of actions by rich people who are still rich. I suspect whatever country my readers are from, you can relate to this in some way.

I read Robert Harris’ wartime code breaking novel Enigma and again felt anger at the secret service. It may be fiction, but it is based on some truth. The public are recruited by a crossword competition; in the book Hester is told to sign the Official Secrets Act and stick to it or the gun on the desk beside the form will be used on her. She has not yet volunteered nor understands how her cryptic puzzle solving skills will be used or what threat she may be under. Tom is also recruited in an underhand way that leaves him little choice. He is threatened by security service officers who appear in his home to scare him off something he accidentally discovers.

It struck me that in the name of protecting democracy, secret services go against the very values that the countries they serve are built on: openness, honesty, trust; protecting the public so that we can go about our lives freely, without fear. I am always appalled when I read of how much control the military and government exerted in the war. What system can be worth fighting for when refusing means that your own side turns on you? Why does an army find the resources to harm conscientious objectors from its own people? In the 1970s TV series, Wonder Woman turns a Nazi through demonstrating that the German army did not care for its own and were happy to kill them. Wonder Woman implies that hers is the better side for its contrasting ethics and treatment. I did some wondering of my own.

After being shocked again at the Katyn forest massacre of Polish prisoners of war and how that the British knew but pretended not to, I decided to watch the Polish 2010 film Katyn to see what they had to say on it. I was horrified at how anyone could shoot thousands of men and dump them in a mass grave, as I was to see a country’s own police demand entry and haul its own people out of their homes to concentration camps in Sarah’s Key. Note none of this was Nazi doing.

Nationalism frightens me when it threatens to make us hate other people and to incite acts of cruelty against them. It is one thing to be proud and loyal of one’s country, another to use that to create otherness instead of brotherness (girls included). The world is our neighbour, not just those with the same passport.

I am struck by the propaganda about war in my own country and am wary of how public statements may be used to influence peer pressure and curtail dissent.

The head of Britain’s MI6 gave a speech about how secrecy is necessary for our country and the rest of the world to go about safely. Yet I don’t feel safe – not because I especially fear terrorism, but the shadowy world of government endorsed crime fighters. I am appalled that the tax office can use spying and that financial safety is a reason to for secret intelligence  – along with that much used slippery phrase ‘threat to national security’.

To complete my trilogy, I watched Fair Game, from the memoir of Valerie Plame Wilson, the former CIA agent (starring Naomi Watts and Sean Penn). She was deliberately outed after her ex-diplomat husband Joe spoke out that he found no weapons of mass destruction and therefore the basis of the 2004 Iraq war was spurious. They fought a long battle against the CIA and the US government. I am unsure exactly where she stands on some issues – in her DVD commentary she does not comment on the question: ‘have you killed people’ or that the CIA bound and beat recruits as part of a training exercise to find their breaking point. Or that she recruited people by manipulation and stealth and that they were not protected by the agency but killed.

I did like her line: security should not stop freedom.

If people fear police and military and security agencies more than terrorism; if liberty is curtailed in the name of keeping us safe, then security ‘services’ are no longer morally or operationally justified as it is acting against their very raison d’être. I read that there have been calls to abolish some secret services. I wonder if any such an agency is really necessary or the best way to combat these problems.

A service built on secrecy and deception is not sound and clashes with the morals and codes of many faiths and ideologies. It involves falsely presenting oneself not only to the adversaries but to one’s own loved ones, meaning isolation for employees as well as anyone who is recruited or who accidentally has a brush with one.

Just as a faith and its true believers are more than and separate to the official church, a nation is not its government, its laws or its leaders and figureheads. These organisations do not get to say what it is we are defending or believing in.

A national interest is not something than an agency or minister defines.

You can’t have equal opps laws and boast of your diversity on one hand whilst enforcing conformity on another.

I am glad of the attempts by the intelligence agencies to be accountable in my country and of the laws which govern them. But then we don’t chose or scrutinise the ministers that call into account or make the laws. Democracy means ‘rule by the people’ but many of us in those kinds of societies don’t feel we get to do the choosing and have the input that so titled society ought.

The  ‘C’ of MI6 speech speaks of enjoying public confidence – which it needs. But stories about Guantanamo Bay, like those on the Canadian Homes Not Bombs site, and Britain’s foreign secretary’s ideas undermine that. I believe that is just part of what many of us are speaking out against. (I have also seen Friday’s news about US police and Occupy protestors).

If secret services fight threats to economic stability that harm the public, I consider they ought to be busy – at all those who caused the recession and its effects. There’s more damage done there by our own  supposed legit institutions than terrorists.

And lastly to those chickens. What do they represent? Freedom despite control. Not being part of the regime. A reminder of nature and how we try to dominate it. A Unitarian hymn at first shocked me by its triteness – but there’s something affirming about ‘the grass that breaks through the concrete’ and the chickens that roost despite the tarmac and concrete built round them. I see those chickens as a symbol of a simpler, more natural life, a refusal to let human bureaucratic control spoil their lives. Their absence therefore concerns me.

After calls to remove them, they were poisoned and attacked and then were rehoused reluctantly by the man who had been feeding them. I know what I infer from that.

And my final word for today on security:

To paraphrase what the Governor of Oregon said today regarding execution:

“I do not believe that these made us safer and certainly they did not make us nobler as a society.”

http://www.chickenroundabout.co.uk/

You can even buy a board game of it!

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Policing protesters

Police heavy handedness is all too common a feature of our broadsheets. Today’s Independent and Guardian reported how protesters in the spring at a London department store were held for many hours and had their homes searched under the terrorism act; over 100 people face trial. There is rightly an outcry from many quarters. I am alarmed and angered that the reasoning is wasting of ‘court time and resources’ as one MP put it, or police time. What matters is that the freedom to peacefully protest is being taken away; and that bullying tactics make this not a free country. This is abuse of power, of law, and an assault to liberty.

Protesting againsta company’s tax evasion is nothing to do with terrorism. That should be tightened to a very slim definition of those using death or the threat of death to make a political point – such as bombings, hostage holding, siege by gunpoint. It is not for people camping out in a commercial premises who had no intention of harming anyone. The phrase ‘national security’ needs to be tightened to mean the above or foreign invasion. The MI5’s other remit, of threats to the economy, should be scrubbed as economy is not part of our national security and comes across as being more concerned about finance than liberty of its citizens.

When, like so many other countries, we are faced with insupportable cuts to deal with a so called debt caused by greedy and irresponsible financiers and our own government’s mistakes, we do not want our already heavy taxes being spent on taking away free comfortable livin. It makes one wonder what other  will be eroded. We want the right to speak up against losses to pension, student support, and all the other services that are suffering. And anything else that matters to us. Conflating demonstration with terrorism means the means to speak out is receding. That is not democracy, it is tyranny.

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I Love You Phillip Morris

The trailer and DVD packaging suggests a laughathon but this is misleading. Those wanting a lighthearted, feel good escape movie will be confronted by some heavy material, including heart break and terminal illness – dying is in the first scene. And those not wanting a silly buddy movie will be wrongly put off a true story which is touching and has some important issues.

It’s those issues that make me write.

The DVD extras make no mention of a campaign to release Steven Jay Russell, who has been in prison in solitary confinement for 13 years. His crime officially is for being a repeat offending con man and escapee. However, being in Texas and under Bush’s presidency, the film hints that the real reason for this severity might be his homosexuality.

Russell says ‘nobody gets hurt.’ In fictional con movie The Brothers Bloom, another Steven says ‘the best tricks are where everyone gets what they want’. The crimes committed are mostly impersonation. Although never trained as a lawyer, Steven Russell performed very well as one. He says in the film to the judge that he didn’t want to see his client – ‘a humble woman’ – roughbeaten by the slick serial litigator for the other side. The judge saw his point – and so do I.

Reading this week about the early King Henrys of England, it emerges that the power of law came from this era – something still in force in England and therefore arguably taken to America by settlers. Many of us internationally feel angry with finance and government at present. The other pillar, law – a ‘service’ many of us can’t afford – is in cahoots with other pillars to enforce a system that often isn’t just. Law should be about justice and protecting the innocent, but so often it’s an expensive form of bullying and is more concerned about property than right. That Steven used it for his own ends is what many people do anyway. He wanted to release his partner from prison – who had served on a minor offence, so he impersonated those who had the power release Phillip. He helped the ‘humble woman’ win her case.

But mostly Steven was motivated by love. It was often twisted into materialism where Steven believed money and gifts buy happiness and that obvious status symbols are our birthright and the signs of success. His partners – Phillip at least – didn’t need that life to believe Steven loved him or treated him well, and it ultimately led to over a decade of separation. Steven made money by putting large amounts of his company’s money in high interest accounts whilst it sat there between transactions. That to me that is acumen, not a crime. It didn’t seem to be hurting anyone – unlike the financial problems of now. He lived the life of investment bankers – and yet very few of those have suffered, especially not those at the top. Instead, their country has bailed them out with public money. Although Steven took a large cut from that fund, it was interest that wasn’t being made without his resourcefulness and the company benefitted as well as him. What would have been better was to have told the board rather than do it secretly – although one asks if the board would have let him keep any of it and if they alone would have benefitted from his idea instead. It seems the fierce punishments for fraud really relates to the value put on money and possession.

Another real life conman was portrayed by Leonardo DiCaprio in Catch Me if You Can. His reward was to be head hunted for a new career that utilised his gall, not punished for it. Why is Steven Russell so different? One wonders if what really upsets the establishment is not the innocent people are duped but that their precious professions are tainted by unqualified outsiders who can ape them and do just as well. It is not that I condone con artistry – and was shocked at his feigning AIDS – but that the punishment for Steven is far too high. He has not harmed anyone. The watershed at end of the film might have changed him, as he realises that that high lifestyle is not necessary and that being a conman hides from being his real self. Instead of being able to put that into practice, he has been locked away for all but one hour each day since 1998, separated from Phillip and the rest of the world.

 His sentence is a ridiculous 144 years – the number beloved of Jehovah’s witnesses and the book of Revelations – more than most serial killers and sexual abusers.

This is disproportionate punishment and is another misuse of public money as well as warped justice.

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