Tag Archives: Labour

Launch the G but promote Hope not Hopi

I was going to congratulate the Guardian, a paper which has sometimes annoyed me for its snobbery and anti Royalist views, for its courage in standing alone amongst the British papers and covering  PRISM and Tempora. I was going to say how I was saddened by the tone the Independent is taking and how it no longer lives up to its name. I was impressed by today’s Guardian for citing quality papers around the world who admiring reported on its stance of printing Snowden’s revelation, and their reaction to all the other British papers attacking the Guardian for doing so. No other British paper or magazine was cited. I was about to say how I wish there was a “G” to rival the i, a mini version of the Guardian, and how I am sorry there are no comparable British newspapers.

And then I read today’s Hopi Sen article on welfare and I wondered which website I was on. Did my hand slip and I typed “Torygraph” instead of Guardian? The majority of the comments – and there are many, already over 200 – showed that Hopi is not the voice of the newspaper’s readership or the public, despite what he claimed. He tries to present his ideas as unarguable. His words both frightened and angered me.  Interventions….! He clearly has no idea, and neither has the comment poster who thinks that long term unemployment is about a lack in social skills, education, mental health and drugs. The jobseeking system is about pigeonholing, drop down menus, and is ignorant that lots of people who are healthy and intelligent do not meet it. It cares little about matching people to appropriate jobs, and I have met many graduates (even PhD holders) who found themselves offered silly, inappropriate roles that would not benefit them or the company. There are some very capable literate people who struggle to work enough to be self sufficient. One comment poster said that Tories don’t empathise with there being no jobs because they’d create ones for themselves by starting a business. Yes, create your own job in principle – but this involves money, and if you do not have it and the right support – it is very very hard to do. It’s made worse by most of us having less money to spend so that new businesses may not be sustainable. And the self made rich are often the hardest on claimants and the ones whose empires crush others and push round the capitalist wheel.

I would like to have shared some of this with the Guardian website itself, but this paragraph in the terms and conditions precluded me:

“You or the owner of the content still own the copyright in the content sent to us, but by submitting content to us, you are granting us an unconditional, irrevocable, non-exclusive, royalty-free, fully transferable, perpetual worldwide licence to use, publish and/or transmit, and to authorise third-parties to use, publish and/or transmit your content in any format and on any platform, either now known or hereinafter invented.”

This all too common phrase  regarding reader comments and other submissions should be as illegal as industrial snooping and forced labour.

Why not say – the content’s yours but you give us the right to publish it on any of our sites, but you can delete it. And we will Not sell or pass it on?

Taking people’s work without pay is the bottom line of much of our welfare issues, for too many of us do not get rewarded for what we do – hence my campaign against use of  internships and volunteers. The issue of big companies imposing their values on the public and taking away their rights and ownership is behind many major imbalances in this world which urgently needs addressing.

I’d like to think that the Guardian led the way on that, as it has on other recent issues.

PS Why ask for letter writer’s address and phone no for verification – isn’t that the kind of snooping the paper rallies against?!

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George Galloway – I’m Not The Only One

I first found the Respect party when I did a search for alternatives to the main ones. I was  intrigued by a social justice, anti war eco driven new political group and wanted to know more about George, their best known MP. I thought I might support and learn from him.

I have come to see him as the caustic Caledonian  – Labour’s Lucifer.

I’m Not The Only One is a hard book to read – not because I can’t understand it, though he does have a wide vocabulary, and his own word “obfuscate” best describes his writing style with sentences constructed like this – but because of his tirade. After the introduction, I wondered if I could manage the rest of the book as I felt I’d been battered with an energy like Michael Moore’s, but more erudite and snide. Happily, the tone lets up a little, but it is still an intense diatribe, though profanity free. George is often very personal and insulting about other politicians. He rarely explains a situation so you only get the George rant, which feels off kilter and his long multi clause sentences seem to hide answers to or ignore the many questions a reader will have.

George spends much time aggrandising or in apologetics. He speaks of his love for Iraq, which at first was very interesting to hear a passionate description of this country  – one he claims he knows better than anyone else in Britain. But the other thread of this book is the love that jilted him, the Labour party whose exclusion after over 30 years of marriage was still very raw in this 2005 book. He defends various things said about him regarding Saddam Hussein, Mariam the Iraqi child he brought to Britain for leukaemia treatment; the War on Want funds; a transcript of his trial in Washington – but not exactly why the Labour Party claimed to need to put him on trial. He often depicts himself as a hero – and a victim.

He had not yet parted ways with Respect leader Salma Yaqoob; and this book is before his Big Brother/Jungle appearances, and that awful rape comment, which he refused to rescind. It is pre the infamous Jeremy Paxman interview when he’d just won the London seat, and though he happily put down Britain’s rudest current affairs presenter, George repeated what seemed a deeply racist and thoughtless statement for someone who claims to understand the Middle East so well. From his website, it seems his style and sentiment hasn’t changed, treating his recent Ed Miliband meeting in the same way.

Reading this book was like a rickety high speed train where you’re glad to get to the end of the journey – or disembark early.

I am surprised but glad that Penguin has published this – it shows freedom of speech being endorsed by a major publisher. For there are some shocking accusations is this book about the truth of US/UK governments and their behaviours, particularly in the Middle East. And sadly, I think they are true. And for bringing those horrors to our attention and daring to say such against grain going risky statements, I applaud George.

I do think that George genuinely wants a better world and has taken brave steps towards that. I’m just not sure about all his methods of getting there.

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